BREAST CANCER: These lifestyle changes that can change everything

                                                                                         Simple lifestyle changes are essential to prevent the incidence of breast cancer and their mere compliance even allows, in some cases, to “cut” the risk in 2, recall the latest recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund and the World Cancer Research Fund. American Institute for Cancer Research. Findings documented in the journal Menopause, and presented at the 30 è Annual Meeting of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS). Recommendations that should guide women, with many other benefits to the key.                 These experts estimate that 1 out of 3 cases of cancer could be avoided by simple lifestyle changes. These recommendations include, unsurprisingly, the maintenance of a healthy weight, the practice of physical activity, adherence to a balanced and diversified diet, the absence of excess alcohol, among other measures. The message is alarming as breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide and these prevention factors rely on a large body of scientific evidence.                                    A healthy lifestyle is the simplest and most effective form of prevention. In 2018, the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research updated their recommendations. Recommendations that also adapt to the specificities of different menopausal status. These guidelines include all of the so-called “avoidable” lifestyle factors and are based on a number of proven facts, including the following. Some essential data giving rise to these recommendations: in postmenopausal women, the risk of breast cancer increases by 1.5 to 2.0 times with obesity; body fat increases the risk of cancer via hyperinsulinemia, estradiol increase and inflammation; physical activity alone can prevent 1 out of 8 cases of breast cancer; alcohol is a carcinogenic factor associated with 6.4% of breast cancer cases; any alcohol consumption increases the risk of breast cancer and the more a woman consumes, the higher her risk of breast cancer; there is a significant inverse relationship between consumption of vegetables other than starch and reduced risk of breast cancer. A call to general practitioners: Dr. Juliana Kling of the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, who presented these recommendations, comments: “Given the magnitude of the incidence of breast cancer and the accumulated evidence that prevention is the most cost-effective and effective long-term strategy for reducing risk, education for a healthy lifestyle should be an essential component of prevention, in primary care, during routine patient visits to their homes. general practitioner “.                                                                         
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